aqueduct with sun

A Good Day in Segovia

During our planning, we considered several day trips from Madrid: Salamanca, Cuenca, Toledo, Avila, and Segovia. We had seen Toledo and Segovia on earlier trips. Salamanca, our top pick, is a 2-hour train ride, too long for a comfortable day trip.

Toward the end of our week in Madrid, we had an open day. We decided to go to Segovia for its beauty. Segovia’s a one-hour ride from Madrid on a fast train. A bus met the train at the Segovia train station and took us to the town center, at the foot of the Roman aqueduct.

Roman aqueduct in Segovia
Roman aqueduct in Segovia

The Romans built this aqueduct around the 1st century to bring water to the Roman fort and town. 28.5 m (93 ft 6 in) tall at its highest point, the aqueduct is constructed with granite blocks and no mortar. The aqueduct was partially damaged by the Moors in 1072 and subsequently reconstructed in the 15th century. The photo below shows mountains with snow in early April.

Roman aqueduct and mountains
Roman aqueduct and mountains

We walked toward the Plaza Mayor looking for a restaurant serving cochinillo asado, roast suckling pig, a Segovia specialty and our planned Madrid splurge. We found cochinillo asado at El Sitio on their menu tipico Segoviano — appetizer, cochinillo entree, dessert, and drink for 22 euros.

cochinillo asado
cochinillo asado

The cochinillo skin was crisp, as it should be. The waiter didn’t cut the cochinillo with spoons in front of us, as Madrid’s Casa Botin had done years ago, but Botin’s cochinillo entree costs more than this meal. I ordered red wine as my drink, and we got a 75 cl bottle, which I couldn’t finish. 😦 The appetizers were sopa castiillana and judiones de la granja. The judiones of the granja region were delicious — very large white beans in a broth made from sausages and pork.

We walked to the alcazar after lunch. Originally a Roman fort, then a Moorish fort (hence its name), the castle was a favorite of Spanish kings and an inspiration for Disneyland’s Cinderella castle. The alcazar sits high above the junction of two rivers.

Segovia Alcazar from the river
Segovia Alcazar from the river

For an afternoon snack, we had a ponche Segoviano, a cake with cream filling, from Pasteleria Limon y Menta. 

ponche Segoviano
ponche Segoviano

Back at the aqueduct, the sun finally came out, with a bit of blue sky. We relaxed and  enjoyed the details of the aqueduct brought out by the sun.

aqueduct with sun
aqueduct with sun

On the photo below, do you see how the lines on the aqueduct converge in the distance? The top of the aqueduct, the top of the first set of arches, and the dark protrusions on the columns each have the same elevation and are parallel, and the lines through them converge in the distance at a point on the bottom right.

Segovia aqueduct illustrates perspective
Segovia aqueduct illustrates perspective

This edited photo shows the lines. The point where the lines converge is called the vanishing point. The lines converging on the vanishing point is part of perspective, a concept that helped Renaissance painters create more life-like pictures.

Converging lines of aqueduct
Converging lines of aqueduct

A nearby butcher shop displayed cochinillos in the window.

cochinillo in the window
cochinillo in the window

We enjoyed Segovia specialties and marveled at the aqueduct and alcazar — a good day in Segovia.

Advertisements

Published by

charley280

I enjoy travel, art, food, photography, nature, California native plants, history, and yoga. I am a retired software engineer. The gravatar is a Nuttall's woodpecker that visited our backyard.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s