Jacquemart-André Museum

We visited the Jacquemart-André Museum for the first time. The museum is named after a wealthy couple who collected art and bequeathed their home, furniture and the art they collected to France as a museum. Art was very important for the couple, who had no children. Édouard André collected art, and Nélie Jacquemart painted his portrait ten years before their marriage.

Completed in 1875, the mansion is set back from the Boulevard Haussmann, except for rooms on both sides that have a gate and passageway for a horse carriage. The setback allows for a yard that’s elevated above the street. (Click on any photo to see an enlargement.)

Musee Jacquemart-Andre
Musee Jacquemart-Andre from across Boulevard Haussmann

The gates and passages allow carriages to drive up a curved driveway to the formal entrance of the house.

carriageway at Jacquemart-Andre
driveway and courtyard at Jacquemart-Andre

The public rooms are large and refined. The grand salon is still decorated with flowers.

The grand salon opens to a 2-story music room.

music room
music room

The winter garden has a glass ceiling, mirrors, two spiral staircases, and potted plants — an elegant place of tranquility.

The private apartments face the courtyard for quiet and privacy. Madame’s bedroom is decorated in the style of Louis XV.

The Jacquemart-André Museum shows the furnishings and art in the context of their home, providing a cohesive picture of a wealthy and tasteful French couple of the late 18th Century. A similar snapshot in time that we liked is Doris Duke’s Shangri la in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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charley280

I enjoy travel, art, food, photography, nature, California native plants, history, and yoga. I am a retired software engineer. The gravatar is a Nuttall's woodpecker that visited our backyard.

2 thoughts on “Jacquemart-André Museum”

    1. Do keep it on your list. Seeing the home, furnishings, and art of one family is idiosyncratic but personal, a rare snapshot of that era in Paris. This museum’s not on the Paris Museum Pass, so it’s easy to overlook. We didn’t buy this pass in April, and we visited some great places we had missed.

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