Wiliwilinui Trail

After visiting Kauai last summer, we went to Honolulu where we joined a family hike in the Koolau Range that forms the backbone of Oahu. Shown above, we are hiking up the Wiliwilinui Ridge to the top of the Koolaus in the distance.

Continue reading Wiliwilinui Trail

Advertisements

Hiking the Kalalau Trail

The day after seeing the Na Pali Coast by helicopter, we saw the Coast from land, hiking part of the Kalalau Trail. On the windward side of Kauai, the Na Pali Coast is hard volcanic rock battered by wind, rain, and erosion. Shown above from my helicopter ride, the Kalalau Trail starts on the left at Ke’e Beach, climbs up the cliff, and goes back down to the ocean at Hanakapi’ai Beach on the right.

Continue reading Hiking the Kalalau Trail

Zion’s Emerald Pools

After walking through Antelope Canyon on our southwest parks road trip, we drove to Zion National Park, where we crossed the Virgin River to hike to Emerald Pools. In early June, the Virgin River is quiet, so it’s hard to imagine that this river carved the Zion Canyon through the red rock. The peak in the photo is 1,400 feet above the river.

Continue reading Zion’s Emerald Pools

Delicate Arch

To kick off our southwest USA road trip, we scheduled three full days in Moab to see Arches and Canyonlands National Parks and to photograph the Milky Way.

We were hampered by road closures at Arches National Park (NP). This season, all park roads are closed for construction weekdays from 7 pm to 7 am. Since dawn was at 6 am and sunset was at 8:30 pm during our visit, the road closure prevented photos of sunrise, sunset, and stars on weekdays. A significant hiking area was closed entirely.  😦

As planned, we arrived in Moab on a Wednesday, one day before the new moon. Moonlight can obscure the faint stars of the Milky Way, so considering the moon phase is important when photographing Milky Way.

Our first morning in Moab was overcast — unfortunate because flat, gray light doesn’t bring out the best in the red rock. We started with the area’s most popular sight, entering Arches NP before the Visitor’s Center opened to hike to Delicate Arch. The hike is 3 miles (4.8 km) roundtrip and climbs 480 feet (146m). With no shade, hiking on a cloudy morning is easier than on a hot afternoon.

Continue reading Delicate Arch

San Andreas Fault at Wallace Creek

We drove to the Carrizo Plain to see the wildflower bloom, so an opportunity to see visible effects of the San Andreas fault was an unexpected bonus. The 1906 San Francisco earthquake on the San Andreas fault led to fires that burned much of San Francisco.

According to a geology tour brochure from the Carrizo Plain National Monument, the San Andreas fault is about 700 miles long, and it’s “the boundary between the Pacific and North American tectonic plates.” The land on each side of the fault has slipped sideways as the tectonic plates moved, and you can see this at Carrizo Plain.

In the above aerial view from Google Earth, the red arrow points to where Wallace Creek crosses the San Andreas fault. The diagonal line running parallel to the Temblor Range is the San Andreas fault. From wikipedia, temblor is “from the Spanish word for ‘earthquake’ (terremoto)”.

Continue reading San Andreas Fault at Wallace Creek